Cokeromyces recurvatus NRRL 2243 v1.0
Figs 1 and 2) Few-spored sporangiola on long recurved pedicles (arising from a terminal vesicle). Fig 3) Darkly pigmented, ornamented zygospores produced by this self-fertile (homothallic) fungus. Images by Kerry O'Donnell.
Figs 1 and 2) Few-spored sporangiola on long recurved pedicles (arising from a terminal vesicle). Fig 3) Darkly pigmented, ornamented zygospores produced by this self-fertile (homothallic) fungus. Images by Kerry O'Donnell.

Cokeromyces recurvatus Poitras NRRL 2243 (= CBS 158.50), the ex-type strain of this monotypic genus [Order Mucorales], was isolated originally from rabbit dung in Illinois, USA by A. Poitras.  It was previously classified within the Thamnidiaceae, but molecular phylogenetic studies support placement within the Mucoraceae (O’Donnell et al. 2000; Walther et al. 2013).  This morphologically distinct species is distinguished by the production of few-spored sporangiola on long recurved pedicles that arise from a terminal vesicle (Figs. 1-2).  This mucoralean mold is self-fertile or homothallic, forming ornamented darkly pigmented zygospores between opposed suspensors (Fig. 3).  In part because it produces low growing colonies, it is used as a host to maintain several mycoparasitic species within the Zoopagales and Dimargaritales. Though rare, Cokeromyces recurvatus has been reported to cause mycotic infections in humans (McGough et al. 1990; Tsai et al., 1997).  The whole-genome sequence of Cokeromyces recurvatus was sequenced within the framework of the 1000 Fungal Genome Project (http://1000.fungalgenomes.org/home/) to advance our understanding of evolution of the early diverging fungi.

References:

McGough DA, Fothergill AW, Rinaldi MG. 1990. Cokeromyces recurvatus Poitras, a distinctive zygomycete and potential pathogen: criteria for identification. Clin. Microbiol. Newslet. 12:113─117.

O’Donnell K, Lutzoni F, Ward TJ, Benny GL. 2000. Evolutionary relationships among mucoralean fungi (Zygomycota): Evidence for family polyphyly on a large scale. Mycologia 93:286─296.

Tsai TW, Hammond LA, Rinaldi M, Martin K, Tio F, Maples J, Freytes CO, Roodman GD. 1997. Cokeromyces recurvatus infection in a bone marrow transplant recipient. Bone Marrow Transplant 19:301─302.

Walther G, Pawłowska J, Alastruey-Izquierdo A, Wrzosek M, Rodriguez-Tudela JL, et al. 2013. DNA barcoding in Mucorales: an inventory of biodiversity. Persoonia 30:11–47.